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Posts Tagged ‘goldfinch’

With this year’s CES (C4) done and dusted we now turn our attentions to other areas of Wraysbury and other sites in general.

Sunday 6th September

Still at Wraysbury but in a different area to our CES, C6, a total of 45 birds were caught with a 34 new/11 retrap split.

Saturday 19th September

Wraysbury C6 again, slightly better numbers than the previous week with a total of 71 birds caught and a 54 new/17 retrap split. The first Meadow pipits of the autumn for the site being the highlight of the session, 10 new birds caught in total and all this hatched this year.

Saturday 26th September

Another visit to Wraysbury C6. Numbers down from previous visit with a 51 new/6 retrap split. Still plenty of Blackcaps on site with 24 caught, all hatched this year and a few more Meadow pipits also all young birds.

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Saturday 1st August

I was finally able to attend another CES session over at Wraysbury. A team of 5 turned out for CES 9. A rather calm session wind wise considering this year’s continued windy weather conditions. In addition to the CES nets we added a further 5 x 60′ nets. The total processed for the day was 131 of which 67 were CES.

Saturday 8th August 

Wraysbury again for CES 10. A cool start with a gentle breeze early on giving way to sunny cloudless skies by mid morning with a light gusting breeze. A total of 114 birds processed with 94 new and 20 retraps.

Sunday 9th August

A busy day was planned for what turned out to be a very pleasant day weather wise, the sun showing for most of the day after a fairly chilly start.

Paul and myself were over at Woolley Firs first thing, a second attempt to catch a juvenile Firecrest and prove they are breeding in Berkshire. We set 2 40’s in the wood and played Firecrest at one net and Blackcap at the other, we didn’t have to wait long for our first bird, on our first check round.

Friday 21st August

A trip to Rutland Water for the Birdfair 2015 accompanied by Carl.

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My first 3 solo  sessions of garden ringing took place on the 10th, 13th & 21st with a total of 20 bird processed, the usual suspects as far as species; Blue tit, Great tit, Coal tit, Chaffinch, Goldfinch, Dunnock, Robin and Goldcrest.

2014-04-10 19.05.45

Mist net – first session in the garden

I have to say, although I’ve been ringing  now for 0ver 3 years I did find these initial sessions on my own quite taxing, not having my trainer within earshot of a ‘help’ for the first time was quite a different feeling. I understand fully now why the initial first sessions need to be in your garden!

Initially at the beginning of April I had 3 boxes with activity; a Great tit sitting in one of the chambers of my Sparrow box, a Wren building a nest in one of the roosting boxes I have up and a Blue tit building a nest in a Blue tit box, by the end of April things had changed somewhat with the Blue tit and Wren both abandoning their nesting attempts, a neighbours cat probably the reason for this as I’d caught it stalking both boxes. The Great tit box the only one showing any signs of life with 7 chicks present,  I estimated them to be 5-6 days old and planned to ring them within the following few days.

Great tit

Female Great tit (ringed) entering box

This is mum entering the nest box, note the ring on the right leg, It’s great to have two generation of the same family already ringed, will be interesting to see if I can catch them again over time.

I also carried out my first visit to check on my other bird boxes in the wood down on the farm, I have 5 boxes in place at the moment and all boxes showed signs of occupation with a feather lined cup visible in 4 and the other, a cup without feathers. Further visits planned for early May.

LS 01 - Lined and ready for laying

LS 01 – Lined and ready for laying

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Its turning out to be a right old busy year so far work wise, I seem to be spending more and more time in front of a monitor doing work and not doing fun. As a consequence the blog as suffered with a lack of post.

So in between the last post and this a few things have happened in my world, most importantly as far as I’m concerned is my ‘C’ permit upgrade, after 3 years, countless early mornings and over 1500 birds processed I’m now qualified to ring on my own.

Sessions since last post:

Woolley Firs 08/03/14

  • Bluti (Blue tit) 2
  • Greti (Great tit) 2
  • Grefi (Greenfinch) 2
  • Blabi (Blackbird) 1
  • Meapi (Meadow pipit) 3
  • Robin 1
  • Golfi (Goldfinch) 5
  • Skyla (Skylark) 1
  • Redwi (Redwing) 1

GMP 23/03/14

  • Bluti (Blue tit) 2
  • Chiff (Chiffchaff) 2
  • Sonth (Song Thrush) 1
  • Blabi (Blackbird) 1
  • Lotti (Long-tailed Tit) 1
  • Robin 1
  • Blaca (Blackcap) 1

Woolley Firs 29/03/14

  • Bluti (Blue tit) 1
  • Yelha (Yellowhammer) 1 – a new bird for me.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

 

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Sunday 16th February

A small team of four met at 0700 hrs at Woolley Firs. We set a 20′, 30′ and 2 x 40′ nets up next to the 3 sets of feeders which have been kept topped up this winter by the WF staff, although there’s been more than ample amounts of natural food available this winter which means less of a need to visit the feeders.

31 birds processed of 8 species, this was my first session out since my ‘C’ permit upgrade conformation and I personally processed 11 birds.

Chaffinch x 2, Goldfinch x 2, Wren x 1, Great tit x 3, Blue tit x 3

We also took the opportunity to GPS all the boxes again with my new Garmin Etrex 20; this was the first time out using the unit on a large number of boxes and it worked really well, quick , accurate and easy to input data.

 

Sunday 2nd March

Another session at Woolley Firs this morning with Carl and Paul, meeting at 0645 hrs. We set a 20′, 30′ and a single 40′ at the feeders with 2 additional 40’s just off the track leading to the fields, Carl had spotted Pied wagtail in the area yesterday. I was tasked with looking after these nets as the track is popular with dog walkers. I did see a few Pied Wags but I didn’t see any in the nets! A 50 strong flock of Redwing were seen atop the trees near to the nets but again nothing came down.

The weather was fair with broken cloud cover for most of the morning turning slightly cloudier later, light winds to start with picking up towards lunchtime.

24 birds processed in total. My contribution:-

Blue tit  x 4,  Dunnock x 1

After we’d set down and packed away had one other task to carry out, apparently Kestrel boxes have a better chance of occupation if they have a few inches of soil in them, so we’ve increased our chances now!

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It’s my favorite time of the year on the Common, the autumnal colours are stunning, especially at sun rise on a clear and crisp autumn morning.

We start to visit the Common more regularly in the autumn after all the CES’ have finished for the season, we do visit during the summer but that’s mostly in the evenings when we are trying to catch Nightjar.

Thursday 24th October.

A clear chilly morning; a rather large team of 13 ringers turning out. There was a little concern that there might not be enough birds caught to satisfy such a large team but our fears were laid to rest within a few minutes of set-up with Redpoll leading the way. It turned out to be very productive morning  with a total of 110 birds processed.

Species                        new    r/t    total
Meadow pipit                25      2       27
Wren                             1                 1
Dartford warbler            5                 5
Blue tit                          1                 1
Greenfinch                  14                14
Goldfinch                       1                 1
Common redpoll            4                 4
Lesser redpoll             48        1      49
Reed bunting               5         1       6
Common Redpoll

Common Redpoll

 
Saturday 2nd November.

Clear skies early on but the wind picked up around 10am which caused an early set-down. This session proved to be a little less productive than the previous with only 16 birds in total processed, I did however get to ring my first Dartford Warbler, the last bird of the day to be caught, which was fantastic.

Species                     new    r/t    total            
Meadow pipit               2       1      3
Dartford warbler          1               1
Goldcrest                     1               1
Long-tailed tit              3       2      5
Coal tit                        1               1
Blue tit                        3              3
Lesser redpoll              1              1 
Reed bunting              1              1
 
 
Dartford Warbler

Dartford Warbler

Dartford Warbler

Dartford Warbler

Saturday 16th November.
 
Another crisp morning and another army of ringers, 14 in total. 
 
Species                     new     r/t   total            
Meadow pipit               1       1      2
Wren                          2               2
Robin                          2               2
Dartford warbler         2      1       3
Goldcrest                    1              1
Long-tailed tit            3       2      5
Coal tit                               1       1
Blue tit                     1                1
Lesser redpol          27      2     29
Common redpoll        2              2
Reed bunting            3              3
 
 
 

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Saturday 19th January

Woolley Firs again for a snow-covered session.  Just Carl and myself  for this one, arriving on site for 0800 we quickly set up 3 nets, a 20ft, 30ft and 40ft around the feeders, the hope was that the cold snowy weather would bring the birds to the feeders.

A reasonable catch of 14 birds was recorded, mostly re-traps with just 3 new. I processed all 14.

Bluti (Blue tit) x 7
Coati (Coal tit) x 1
Greti (Great tit) x 3
Nutha (Nuthatch) x 2
Robin x 1

Sunday 20th January

I decided to set up my hide in the garden and take advantage of the concentration of birds due to the snowy conditions and all the seed and fruit I’d put out.

Plenty of the usual suspects, Blue, Great Long-tailed and Coal tit, Robins, Dunnocks, Wren, Chaffinch, at least 8 Blackbirds and a real treat a couple of Fieldfare, a winter migrant from Northern Europe, this is indicative of the tough conditions the birds are facing at this time.

Chaffinch

Chaffinch

Fieldfare 04

Fieldfare

Fieldfare 03

Fieldfare

Fieldfare 01

Fieldfare

Fieldfare 02

Fieldfare

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